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Logi Apprentice
BlackHawk1776
Posts: 137
Registered: ‎01-29-2011
Accepted Solution

Powerline networking bandwidth problem

I've got 5 cameras - three work very well, the occosional glitch here and there but nothing interesting.  I just had an electrician wire up a new outlet in the attic so that I could connect two more cameras.  The cameras are visible, everything connects however there isn't enough bandwidth for one camera, let alone two apparently.  I've been doing A LOT of testing and this is my most educated guess at this point.  I had both cameras connected and had a ping test going to each - they both ping MUCH higher (meaning a slower connection / more latency) than my three other cameras.  When I disconnect either one of the two cameras the remaining camera shows lower latency (still not in line with my other cameras.)

 

The electrician tapped into an existing power line that was used to power some smoke detectors (which have are no longer in use.)  Since this seems to be a big part of the problem aside from a fresh 'home run' back to the fuse panel, what is a good connection to use that is likely to yield better results?

 

Also how likely are items using the same circuit to affect the latency of the connection?  I've not been able to detect any sort of interference at this point but since I'm going to be getting this wired up differently I'ld like to avoid any known issues if there are any at this time.

BlackHawk1776
(Insert very private, personal information here)
I fix stuff for a living and for fun.
5 External Cameras recording in Commander, Android and BlackBerry apps running as well.
Logi Guru
UselessS
Posts: 1,401
Registered: ‎04-01-2011

Re: Powerline networking bandwidth problem

If you are having to run wires, then consider going to POE...at least for the cameras involved in that rewiring.  Powerline stuff is a bit like wireless in that a lot of things can affect it that are not terribly obvious.  You "could" run the troublesome cameras on extension cords to test different outlets/circuits...at least giving you a better idea of what your environment is for powerline.

 

I have mine on POE as it was easier to run ethernet than power...and that eliminates the powerline varibility layer-of-the-onion.  My POE switch is also plugged in to a UPS...which insulates it from power glitches/outages...so never any problems with having to reset for a variety of issues from that.

Logi Apprentice
BlackHawk1776
Posts: 137
Registered: ‎01-29-2011

Re: Powerline networking bandwidth problem

So I've had one heck of a busy week otherwise I would have posted back earlier.  As UselessS suggested I did try using a power cord to plug them in elsewhere I was already planning to do this but being lazy and having someone else suggest it helped me get off my butt to do it.)  The end result: Paydirt.  Connecting the cameras via a different power source solved all of the latency problems, which doesn't answer the question of why - but it does work as a solution.  While I love the idea of running PoE for all of my cameras I'm just not keen on doing cabing to that extent myself and not looking to pay someone else to do it right now.  (There would be some wall fishing involved since I don't want cables running on the exterriror walls of the house.)

 

I do love the advantage you get from having all of your cameras powered by a PoE switch connected to a good UPS which brings up a question - what kind of load do a couple of cameras and PoE switch create?  What capacity UPS did you use for your solution?

BlackHawk1776
(Insert very private, personal information here)
I fix stuff for a living and for fun.
5 External Cameras recording in Commander, Android and BlackBerry apps running as well.
Logi Guru
UselessS
Posts: 1,401
Registered: ‎04-01-2011

Re: Powerline networking bandwidth problem

Glad you were able to isolate good/bad receptacles...at least now you know.  Yeah, the "why" may be tricky to figure-out.  I've seen relatively new homes have issues and old ones not...and vice-versa...so can't use that excuse <g>  Anything with motors...particularily brush motors are probably the 1st suspects, but there are many things that can generate interference on the power lines ( or block the "designed noise" from powerline <g> ).

 

I think the cameras draw 7 watts max ( night )...so not a lot even with a POE switch driving several things.  My UPS is probably not a good example as I have a lot hanging on it...2 routers, 3 switches, Vonage box, 2 phones, and 2 radio P/Ss ( my ISP is via RF...I have 2 separate connections ).  I use 1500VA UPS ( APC BR1500 )...and I use 4 of them in various places ( I have a lot of computer stuff...work from home and I tinker a lot as well <g> ).   I think you could look at the power specs for your router, switch, and whatever else you want to support on UPS to figure it out...better to overkill than to underkill...not all that much difference in $$.  Most of the time you don't need UPS for big outages...just allow time to do orderly shut-downs when needed.